Hellfire



Ordered

Postby bailbath » Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:54 pm

I have just ordered a new copy off Amazon as you can see from my copy that I scanned in to my PC and embedded above, it is a bit dog eared.
It is still a good read(dispite what I said above) and I want a good copy while it is available.
I also have heard that we can expect Great ball of fire the Murray Silver book out near the end of the year.This is going to be updated as far as I have heard.I think it is a pretty good book and look forward to buying it.Jerry Lee has had so many releases this year of different cds,dvds,books it is hard to keep a trace!!Which is great.
IAN
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Postby Maarten K. » Thu Jun 21, 2007 10:54 pm

Perk wrote:It´s not a "facts" book, it´s rather a story about Jerry´s inner struggles etc.


To what extend do you think this is true? Was (or is) Jerry really that troubled by these struggels between 'right' or 'wrong' or could this be blown up in the myth-building?
There are of course the famous Sun discussion and numerous quotes ("Don't mess with mr. in between") which could indicate this is true.
And on that unkown Australian tv-show I came across some time ago I believe Jerry even says something like the Devil being the orchestra director at one time. But we all know not everything one says can/ should be taken that serious or necesseraly point in one direction.
I wonder how others look at this.
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Postby Perk » Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:15 pm

I see the book a bit different than all the other books. As i see it as a good storytelling book! About truth or not may not be so important in the case of this one.

Perk ; )
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Postby peterchecksfield » Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:28 pm

Linda Gail says that Jerry feels guilty every time he plays rock & roll, yet can't give it up. So I think at least some it is true. I find it strange that Jerry almost never includes gospel songs on stage now though, he used to include them in nearly every show during the 70s, & quite often in the 80s.
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Postby Stephanie » Thu Jun 21, 2007 11:40 pm

peterchecksfield wrote:Linda Gail says that Jerry feels guilty every time he plays rock & roll, yet can't give it up. So I think at least some it is true. I find it strange that Jerry almost never includes gospel songs on stage now though, he used to include them in nearly every show during the 70s, & quite often in the 80s.


Really? So maybe when we saw him last and I took my daughter up to the stage in my arms during GBOF, this was why he looked so unimpressed with me. And I know he remebered seeing me before. Ok, maybe that's not why, but that thought makes me feel better.
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Postby peterchecksfield » Tue Aug 04, 2009 8:29 pm

Andrew McRae wrote:I agree that Peter Guralnick is the top man the field. Not least of the disappointments associated with the lack of Grammy academy recognition for "Last Man Standing" was the fact that his essay in the booklet didn't get nominated in the related category.

PG's "Sweet Soul Music" is an essential reference, and undoubtedly the best written introduction to southern/country soul music you could wish for. One day I hope he'll expand on some of the contents of this work and write a definitive biography of Solomon Burke.

Andrew


I'm starting to have second thoughts on Peter Guralnick's suitability as a JLL biographer. Yes, he's very thorough with the facts & his research is second-to-none, but he's not much of a storyteller. I'm currently struggling to read his Sam Cooke biography, & granted Sam Cooke is only someone whom I have a casual interest in, but I'm finding it extremely dull! A more charismatic writer could have made it a far more interesting read without altering the basic facts.
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Re: Ordered

Postby peterchecksfield » Tue Aug 04, 2009 8:35 pm

bailbath wrote:I also have heard that we can expect Great ball of fire the Murray Silver book out near the end of the year.This is going to be updated as far as I have heard.I think it is a pretty good book and look forward to buying it.


Presumably nothing happened with this?
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Postby bailbath » Wed Aug 05, 2009 8:05 am

I think Murray Silver has something to do with JW Brown's book as well. I did have Murray's email I will try to find it and email him.
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Postby peterchecksfield » Wed Aug 05, 2009 8:12 am

bailbath wrote:I think Murray Silver has something to do with JW Brown's book as well. I did have Murray's email I will try to find it and email him.
Ian


Murray isn't my favourite writer (or my favourite person), but his research is excellent. So if he's involved we shouldn't have the appalling factual errors of the JLL & LGL official biographies.
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Postby Tony Papard » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:55 am

peterchecksfield wrote:
bailbath wrote:I think Murray Silver has something to do with JW Brown's book as well. I did have Murray's email I will try to find it and email him.
Ian


Murray isn't my favourite writer (or my favourite person), but his research is excellent. So if he's involved we shouldn't have the appalling factual errors of the JLL & LGL official biographies.


Frankie Jean should write a biography. It would, of course, have to be categorized as 'fiction' due to her vivid imagination. But it would be extremely interesting and entertaining. For example, how Jerry managed to be born in the Lewis House and also in a shack in a cottonfield (in actual fact the wooden house where the family lived and in which he was born has long since been demolished.)

Also be interesting to know how Mamie Lewis knew Gladys Presley way back in the late 1930s! :wink:
Long ago in Ferriday down in Louisiana, They all watched Jerry play and pump that old piana

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http://www.btinternet.com/~tony.papard/JERRYLEELEWIS.HTM
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Postby Tommy » Wed Aug 05, 2009 9:11 pm

Hellfire got released here in Sweden last year with overwhelming reviews. I´ve just read an interview by a swedish famous musicjournalist with Tosches. One thing I didn´t know was that Tosches didn´t made anything up about the Gracelandsituation. Except of Elvis dreams of course.
"Don't look at the clouds of tomorrow through the sunshine of today!"

Mick Jagger
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Postby Andrew McRae » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:10 am

peterchecksfield wrote:
Andrew McRae wrote:I agree that Peter Guralnick is the top man the field. Not least of the disappointments associated with the lack of Grammy academy recognition for "Last Man Standing" was the fact that his essay in the booklet didn't get nominated in the related category.

PG's "Sweet Soul Music" is an essential reference, and undoubtedly the best written introduction to southern/country soul music you could wish for. One day I hope he'll expand on some of the contents of this work and write a definitive biography of Solomon Burke.

Andrew


I'm starting to have second thoughts on Peter Guralnick's suitability as a JLL biographer. Yes, he's very thorough with the facts & his research is second-to-none, but he's not much of a storyteller. I'm currently struggling to read his Sam Cooke biography, & granted Sam Cooke is only someone whom I have a casual interest in, but I'm finding it extremely dull! A more charismatic writer could have made it a far more interesting read without altering the basic facts.


I haven't read PG's Sam Cooke biography but I just wonder if what you perceive as its shortcomings in terms of 'storytellling' might be to do, at least in part, with the inevitable lack of personal contact / interview etc with the subject.

Whilst I haven't read it for years, I do seem to recall that the liveliest chapters of PG's "Sweet Soul Music" were the extensive episodes devoted to Solomon Burke, which I think reflected the 'relationship' that existed between the author and his subject (plus, of course, the fact that SB himself has both led a fascinating life and is good at spinning a yarn). I feel that PG might be able to pull off a similar trick with JLL...

Andrew
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Re: Hellfire

Postby bailbath » Sun Sep 18, 2011 6:47 pm

Not about Hellfire but a new book about the music industry in the 50s

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/ ... ce-for-sat

Q&A: Nick Tosches on His New Book, Save the Last Dance for Satan, and the Lovable Underwear Company
by Alexandra Beggs 3:30 PM, SEPTEMBER 15 2011


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BY JACOB BLICKENSTAFF.

A crowd of first-wave hipsters and suited editor types were waiting among the stacks of poetry anthologies and pulp romance paperbacks in New York's Jefferson Market Library last Friday. We were all waiting for Nick Tosches, Vanity Fair writer and biographer of Jerry Lee Lewis and Dean Martin (among others) and author of the novel In the Hand of Dante. Nick was going to read from Save the Last Dance for Satan, a longer version of a story about the music industry in the 50s that he wrote for the December 2000 issue of V.F.

In the library, which was once a courthouse and women’s detention center, organizers had set up a podium for Tosches on a walkway above the reading room. I kept envisioning the scene from Suddenly, Last Summer where Elizabeth Taylor, trying to escape from a mental asylum, ends up on a catwalk above the men’s recreational room—and the men (already crazy) go even crazier at the sight of her. I hoped for the same reaction when Nick strode on the walkway, and sure enough when he appeared in a gray suit (which perfectly matched his gray hair) the crowd went wild.

He started reading right away in his Humphrey Bogart rasp, and the cheers turned to silence. After each poem or excerpt, he tossed the papers he was reading from into the crowd—and more than one adult leapt to grab them.

A few days after the reading, I called Nick to discuss the corrupt but exciting music industry in New York in the 50s.

One ring.

Nick Tosches: Alex.

VF Daily: Hi Nick. Are you at home right now?

Yep. Right now is the perfect time because I’m sitting here with my glass of cold milk and it’s my late-afternoon break.

I’m glad I could catch you.

I’m glad to be caught by you.

Where did the title Save the Last Dance for Satan come from?

It just came into my evil brain when I was writing it. It seemed to fit.

When did you move from Newark to Manhattan?

1969. I was 19, and I had a job at the Lovable Underwear Company, at 200 Madison Avenue. That’s true. I was doing back then, in the days before computers, what they called paste-ups and mechanicals. You have a glue pot, a tea square, a razor blade, and you physically put together advertisements. That was the year I got my first piece published in a magazine called Fusion.

Was it a music piece?

No. It had to do with poetry.

Is that what you were interested in writing about?

Poetry and prose both. I still write a lot of poetry but I don’t know who lives on poetry in this day and age. I used to be able to name three but I don’t know if I can name one. I’ve been lucky. I’ve been able to write what I want, when I want, and that’s really fortunate, especially these days.

What is it about the 50s music scene that interested you for this book?

There were a lot of great records made in this period, which goes from Elvis to 1965. But mostly before then, you had black guys singing about getting sloppy fall-down drunk on rot gut, and then Elvis came along and censored rock 'n' roll and made it acceptable for the white masses and transformed rock 'n' rollfrom a basically black music to something like a white-bread version. It went from rot gut to milkshakes. That’s what happened to it. But beneath the surface, it was the people that were involved in putting a lot of these records out who were the wildest, most corrupt and interesting crew of characters ever brought together. That intrigued me. I forget what the question was, but was that an answer?

Yes. So what kind of corruption are we talking about?

Paying off disc jockeys to play certain records. This was fun corruption; these guys were characters. Now it’s bland. People were counterfeiting records that were hits and other gentlemen were being called in to destroy the counterfeiting pressing plants. Certain musicians had to be trailed and guarded because of their, let’s say, sexual proclivities in that day of superficial innocence; the jukebox industry which was and always has been Mafia controlled on a major level. As someone said, “Business as usual.” Nothing was done without some form of bribery, some form of shake down, some form of physical threat, some form of violence, some form of arson. That’s the way it operated, and on the surface there were all of these saccharine, lilting songs of love—it was a weird combination.

Along with the book, the publisher is also selling a perfume called “Tosches.” Did you design the scent?

Yes. Right now I’m having such a kick of being a parfumeur, as the French would say. The publisher brought me several scents to choose from, and I picked the one I liked most and then it was adjusted from there. It’s a faint floral scent. I wanted to call it “Eau du Newark,” rather than my name, because the label has the old Newark skyline and superimposed on it is the motif of 78 RPM label from Savoy records, Newark’s biggest R&B record label. Also it’s my hometown and I wanted to associate the name more with Newark. But I was overruled, and that was it.

I saw that you tried to submit a picture of your leopard-print loafers for your V.F. contributor photo.

I just like that picture! I don’t know if they took me seriously or not. I haven’t heard back. It bugs me: Everybody’s always concentrating on heads, and we have these other aspects. Those are almost 30 years old and the most comfortable shoes I have. I bought them at that store uptown, Bottega Veneta, and they wore out, got beat up. I couldn’t replace them. They're fake cougar skin. Actually someone offered to buy them off me and I said, “No, they’re too comfortable.” Try and use the shoes. It’s the Internet!
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