Jerry Lee Lewis: Lost and Found Book



Postby Tumppi » Sun Dec 13, 2009 6:15 pm

I received the book at thursday and got through it now. There's some opinions which I don't agree and some bad errors too, like Jari mentioned. But there's also some great analysis, though not so thorough as I expected. It's certainly not the best book I've read about JLL, but everyone who's interested about his music should read this.

Tuomas K.
Tumppi

 
Posts: 244
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2007 9:08 am
Location: Äetsä, Finland

Postby martin bates » Sun Dec 13, 2009 8:22 pm

jllWAfan1982 wrote:
The rumors were intended to help SPARK sales and create controversy.


?? If I recall correctly, the rumour was that the book was to be banned or scrapped on the orders of JLL . How would that help sales ????

As it happens I've not read the book yet; mine arrived but was hastily wrapped up for my birthday :D (december 18th) .Still looking forward to it,but most comments seem a little lukewarm-perhaps expectations were too high.

Martin.
martin bates

 
Posts: 1116
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 8:13 pm

Postby jllWAfan1982 » Sun Dec 13, 2009 9:57 pm

Historically banned books tend to sell the best. A book's being banned is guaranteed success in the literary world. Of course this is just a small forum, and it actually was not banned. But if it had been truly banned and the public was aware of it, they would have been flying off the shelves.
If it's good enough for me,
It should be good enough for you.
--Jerry Lee Lewis
jllWAfan1982

 
Posts: 725
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2008 10:12 pm
Location: Pluto

Postby peterchecksfield » Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:05 pm

jllWAfan1982 wrote:Historically banned books tend to sell the best. A book's being banned is guaranteed success in the literary world. Of course this is just a small forum, and it actually was not banned. But if it had been truly banned and the public was aware of it, they would have been flying off the shelves.


Or alternatively they wouldn't try to buy it in the first place because they'd think it was unavailable...


:roll:
peterchecksfield

 

Postby jayhawks » Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:39 am

jllWAfan1982 wrote:Historically banned books tend to sell the best. A book's being banned is guaranteed success in the literary world. Of course this is just a small forum, and it actually was not banned. But if it had been truly banned and the public was aware of it, they would have been flying off the shelves.


:thumbsdown :damnfunny :ROFL :thumbsdown
I'm a rollin' stone all alone and lost
For a life of sin I have paid the cost
When I pass by all the people say
Just another guy on the lost highway
jayhawks

User avatar
 
Posts: 1236
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:45 am

The Greatest Live Show on Earth

Postby Andrew McRae » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:03 pm

I just received my copy of Joe's book. I've only, thus far, had a quick skim through but my eyes did land on a few pages which struck a rather discordant note with me.

As Joe himself acknowledges, on page 134, 'some fans are likely to disagree'.... (here, in reference, to his view that "The Return of Rock" and "Memphis Beat" 'sound... like virtually the same album'... er, yes, I do disagree about that as it happens!)

But what I really find surprising is the rather casual dismissal of "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" (pages 127-130). Moreover there are the usual factual errors, derived from taking the album sleeve at 'face value', all of which have been corrected in print previously.

(i) the date of the show was 18th July, not 1st July, 1964
(ii) JLL was not playing an upright piano
(iii) JLL was not wearing a black suit and narrow white tie

Joe, the only photo representative of the taping on 18th July is that at lower left on the front cover of the sleeve, where JLL is pictured at a black grand piano, wearing a greenish coloured suit and green tie.. the other photos were taken at a completely different show... (in like manner with the practice as per both "Star Club" and "By Request", to avoid JLL being pictured surrounded by microphones and recording paraphenalia)

I have my own, very different perspective of "The Greatest Live Show On Earth", which has been published, piecemeal, before on this Forum. An article was also featured in Fireball Mail about a year ago, and I am taking this opportunity to post this in full on a separate thread, in an attempt to redress the balance of opinion! For my money, "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" is, er... just that! Give it another listen, Joe... I think it's equally significant to "Star-Club"! But then, as you say, us fans will all have different opinions!

Andrew

PS What's the source of the suggestion (page 116) that "Star-Club" was issued in America by Mercury in 1986? Jari and myself might go nuts trying to find a copy unless you retract that statement! As the 1992 Rhino CD liner notes made clear, that was the first US issue.
Andrew McRae

User avatar
 
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:26 pm

Re: The Greatest Live Show on Earth

Postby peterchecksfield » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:14 pm

Andrew McRae wrote:... (in like manner with the practice as per both "Star Club" and "By Request", to avoid JLL being pictured surrounded by microphones and recording paraphenalia)...


Do we have any (probable) real photos from the Fort Worth concerts?
peterchecksfield

 

Re: The Greatest Live Show on Earth

Postby jayhawks » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:17 pm

Andrew McRae wrote:I just received my copy of Joe's book. I've only, thus far, had a quick skim through but my eyes did land on a few pages which struck a rather discordant note with me.

As Joe himself acknowledges, on page 134, 'some fans are likely to disagree'.... (here, in reference, to his view that "The Return of Rock" and "Memphis Beat" 'sound... like virtually the same album'... er, yes, I do disagree about that as it happens!)

But what I really find surprising is the rather casual dismissal of "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" (pages 127-130). Moreover there are the usual factual errors, derived from taking the album sleeve at 'face value', all of which have been corrected in print previously.

(i) the date of the show was 18th July, not 1st July, 1964
(ii) JLL was not playing an upright piano
(iii) JLL was not wearing a black suit and narrow white tie

Joe, the only photo representative of the taping on 18th July is that at lower left on the front cover of the sleeve, where JLL is pictured at a black grand piano, wearing a greenish coloured suit and green tie.. the other photos were taken at a completely different show... (in like manner with the practice as per both "Star Club" and "By Request", to avoid JLL being pictured surrounded by microphones and recording paraphenalia)

I have my own, very different perspective of "The Greatest Live Show On Earth", which has been published, piecemeal, before on this Forum. An article was also featured in Fireball Mail about a year ago, and I am taking this opportunity to post this in full on a separate thread, in an attempt to redress the balance of opinion! For my money, "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" is, er... just that! Give it another listen, Joe... I think it's equally significant to "Star-Club"! But then, as you say, us fans will all have different opinions!

Andrew

PS What's the source of the suggestion (page 116) that "Star-Club" was issued in America by Mercury in 1986? Jari and myself might go nuts trying to find a copy unless you retract that statement! As the 1992 Rhino CD liner notes made clear, that was the first US issue.


could someone please post some photos from the "real" starclub- 1964- concert?!
I'm a rollin' stone all alone and lost
For a life of sin I have paid the cost
When I pass by all the people say
Just another guy on the lost highway
jayhawks

User avatar
 
Posts: 1236
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:45 am

Re: The Greatest Live Show on Earth

Postby Andrew McRae » Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:28 pm

Andrew McRae wrote:I just received my copy of Joe's book. I've only, thus far, had a quick skim through but my eyes did land on a few pages which struck a rather discordant note with me.

As Joe himself acknowledges, on page 134, 'some fans are likely to disagree'.... (here, in reference, to his view that "The Return of Rock" and "Memphis Beat" 'sound... like virtually the same album'... er, yes, I do disagree about that as it happens!)

But what I really find surprising is the rather casual dismissal of "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" (pages 127-130). Moreover there are the usual factual errors, derived from taking the album sleeve at 'face value', all of which have been corrected in print previously.

(i) the date of the show was 18th July, not 1st July, 1964
(ii) JLL was not playing an upright piano
(iii) JLL was not wearing a black suit and narrow white tie

Joe, the only photo representative of the taping on 18th July is that at lower left on the front cover of the sleeve, where JLL is pictured at a black grand piano, wearing a greenish coloured suit and green tie.. the other photos were taken at a completely different show... (in like manner with the practice as per both "Star Club" and "By Request", to avoid JLL being pictured surrounded by microphones and recording paraphenalia)

I have my own, very different perspective of "The Greatest Live Show On Earth", which has been published, piecemeal, before on this Forum. An article was also featured in Fireball Mail about a year ago, and I am taking this opportunity to post this in full on a separate thread, in an attempt to redress the balance of opinion! For my money, "The Greatest Live Show on Earth" is, er... just that! Give it another listen, Joe... I think it's equally significant to "Star-Club"! But then, as you say, us fans will all have different opinions!

Andrew

PS What's the source of the suggestion (page 116) that "Star-Club" was issued in America by Mercury in 1986? Jari and myself might go nuts trying to find a copy unless you retract that statement! As the 1992 Rhino CD liner notes made clear, that was the first US issue.


I've now read Joe's book through and I think that taken as a whole it's a delightful, beautifully written work. There's a fair amount of comment I don't necessarily agree with, but that doesn't detract either from my enjoyment of, or high estimation, of a very readable, entertaining and thought-provoking book.

I've already aired my own, subjective interpretation of "The Greatest Live Show On Earth" as a rather more significant album than acknowledged here, a point on which Joe has responded generously.

That apart, I do think the brief 'lumping together' of all Mercury albums dating from 1971 to 1977 (a single paragraph commencing at the foot of page 169) is very harsh and will bemuse not just me, but perhaps many other fans who were around at the time and bought these albums 'hot off the press'. After all, "The 'Killer' Rocks On" and "The Session" (both of which are mis-titled and mis-dated in Joe's account!) both produced Top Forty 'pop' singles, and it's rather misleading to suggest that these - along with "Southern Roots", given similar scant regard - were 'cut to satisfy the Nashville formula'

A couple of other minor editorial points to add to those already identified by others; much as I hate to admit to ever having heard "The Return of Jerry Lee", the 'lascivious growl' mentioned on page 27 should be attributed to 'Mean Woman Blues', not 'Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On'; and (page 60) 'Hit The Road, Jack' was written by Percy Mayfield, not Ray Charles.

I'm certainly not aware of any basis for the suggestion on page 161 that 'rock'n'roll' performances from the 1970 Las Vegas shows ever 'cropped up on bootlegs'. I'm sure the first time any of us got to hear them was when Bear Family issued them legitimately in 1986.

Finally, another - very minor - point for the record, particularly for the fashion cognoscenti, and apologies, Joe, for again possibly making you wish you'd never stopped to think about what Jerry Lee was wearing on stage in 1964, never mind write about it, (ref page 96)! But the fact is that the photos we have of Jerry Lee's recorded performance in the Star-Club (notably that which graces the cover of the LP "Star-Date With Jerry Lee Lewis") clearly show him wearing a double-breasted black (no pin stripe) suit with a blue (not white) shirt! You appear to be describing the suit and shirt worn the previous evening in Berlin, as seen on the LP cover! But I would allow the possibility that the photos we have of events on 5th April in Hamburg were all taken during the course of the second show that night, and I can well imagine that, at the very least, Jerry Lee would have changed his shirt at 'half-time'! So you can stick two fingers up at this one, assuming you have some evidence to support the sartorial case you've put forward! :wink:

But these points apart, I can thoroughly recommend what is an excellent read.

Andrew
Andrew McRae

User avatar
 
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:26 pm

Postby bailbath » Wed Dec 16, 2009 6:28 pm

Finished Joe's book, overall I enjoyed it but more enthusiasm for some parts than others Andrew's comments above pretty much sum it up but at the end of the book I will admit to a very warm feeling to the book and a bit of a tear in the eye. The love that the various commentary from different people came shining through and left me 'breathless'!! It was nice for this forum and some of it's members to be mentioned and maybe in few years time the topic 'did you become a fan via Joe's book?' will appear!
I will reread this book in due course but for now I rate it and consider it essential reading for Lewis fan's or non fan's!
Ian
bailbath

User avatar
Site Admin
 
Posts: 2667
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 7:49 am
Location: Bath, uk

Postby peterchecksfield » Wed Dec 16, 2009 6:52 pm

bailbath wrote:Finished Joe's book, overall I enjoyed it but more enthusiasm for some parts than others Andrew's comments above pretty much sum it up but at the end of the book I will admit to a very warm feeling to the book and a bit of a tear in the eye. The love that the various commentary from different people came shining through and left me 'breathless'!! It was nice for this forum and some of it's members to be mentioned and maybe in few years time the topic 'did you become a fan via Joe's book?' will appear!
I will reread this book in due course but for now I rate it and consider it essential reading for Lewis fan's or non fan's!
Ian


Strange how we're all impressed by different things. I really enjoyed most of the book, but found that the commentary near the end dragged it down a bit (there's no doubting the sincerity of the comments though).

In this book two things stand out for me in comparison with the other books:

(1) This is the only book that focuses mostly on Jerry's "lost" & (to me) musically most interesting decade. Jerry (& his producers) were never afraid to experiment in the quest for that elusive "hit" during the era from 'The Hawk' in 1960 until 'Soul My Way' in 1967; with a few notable exceptions, he pretty much played it safe in the studio after the big hits started again.

(2) Joe's opinions are refreshingly different from most other writers (I don't think many would praise the 1962 cut of 'Be-Bop-A-Lula' over the 1964 studio cut of 'I'm On Fire' but I'm still delighted to read that someone thinks that!).
peterchecksfield

 

Postby Andrew McRae » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:05 pm

peterchecksfield wrote:
bailbath wrote:Finished Joe's book, overall I enjoyed it but more enthusiasm for some parts than others Andrew's comments above pretty much sum it up but at the end of the book I will admit to a very warm feeling to the book and a bit of a tear in the eye. The love that the various commentary from different people came shining through and left me 'breathless'!! It was nice for this forum and some of it's members to be mentioned and maybe in few years time the topic 'did you become a fan via Joe's book?' will appear!
I will reread this book in due course but for now I rate it and consider it essential reading for Lewis fan's or non fan's!
Ian


Strange how we're all impressed by different things. I really enjoyed most of the book, but found that the commentary near the end dragged it down a bit (there's no doubting the sincerity of the comments though).

In this book two things stand out for me in comparison with the other books:

(1) This is the only book that focuses mostly on Jerry's "lost" & (to me) musically most interesting decade. Jerry (& his producers) were never afraid to experiment in the quest for that elusive "hit" during the era from 'The Hawk' in 1960 until 'Soul My Way' in 1967; with a few notable exceptions, he pretty much played it safe in the studio after the big hits started again.

(2) Joe's opinions are refreshingly different from most other writers (I don't think many would praise the 1962 cut of 'Be-Bop-A-Lula' over the 1964 studio cut of 'I'm On Fire' but I'm still delighted to read that someone thinks that!).


You've hit the nail on the head, there! I similarly found the lengthy eulogising of "Ramblin' Rose" a surprise; it's never struck me as being anything that exceptional.

I found much to disagree about - and I note you've been commendably restrained over Joe's opinion about your own favourite 'Golden Hits' track, not to mention "Soul My Way"! But as you suggest, this demonstrates the strength of the book and of Joe's writing - we're happy to read and respect his arguments rather than just grumble and dismiss such opinions.

One thing I didn't comment on previously was how absorbing I found the background to Joe's own 'path' to discovering JLL music, i.e. by reference to other performers and musical trends that were largely unfamiliar to me.

Andrew
Andrew McRae

User avatar
 
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:26 pm

Postby peterchecksfield » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:19 pm

Actually Joe isn't quite as dismissive of 'Soul My Way' as many are, but yes, I still prefer Jerry's performance on the 1963 recut of 'Breathless' to the Sun version despite the backing (I also probably prefer the 1963 version of 'You Win Again' to the 1957 single).

I also particularly enjoyed reading how Joe discovered JLL / Live at The Star Club.

Incidentally I just attempted to write a fuller review for amazon.co.uk but they won't let me as the book hasn't been released yet! :roll:
peterchecksfield

 

Postby Andrew McRae » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:31 pm

peterchecksfield wrote:Actually Joe isn't quite as dismissive of 'Soul My Way' as many are, but yes, I still prefer Jerry's performance on the 1963 recut of 'Breathless' to the Sun version despite the backing (I also probably prefer the 1963 version of 'You Win Again' to the 1957 single).



.. so ignorant of contemporary musical styles that it may as well have been a comedy album. "Please welcome: The Woefully-Out-of-Touch.."

Jeez... what on earth have others been saying to slag it off then! :wink:
Andrew McRae

User avatar
 
Posts: 921
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:26 pm

Postby peterchecksfield » Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:39 pm

Andrew McRae wrote:
peterchecksfield wrote:Actually Joe isn't quite as dismissive of 'Soul My Way' as many are, but yes, I still prefer Jerry's performance on the 1963 recut of 'Breathless' to the Sun version despite the backing (I also probably prefer the 1963 version of 'You Win Again' to the 1957 single).



.. so ignorant of contemporary musical styles that it may as well have been a comedy album. "Please welcome: The Woefully-Out-of-Touch.."

Jeez... what on earth have others been saying to slag it off then! :wink:


Yes, but he also (more or less) praises some of the better tracks ('Turn On Your Lovelight', 'It's A Hang Up Baby', 'Treat Her Right', 'Betcha Gonna Like It').
peterchecksfield

 

PreviousNext

Return to Archive

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests