John Cash



John Cash

Postby bailbath » Sat Feb 26, 2011 6:12 pm

http://tasteofcountry.com/johnny-cash-b ... ic-legend/

Fans of the legendary Johnny Cash are marking what would have been his 79th birthday today, but it’s hard to see it as a sad occasion. After all, the country-rock legend spent 71 long, creative and often adventurous years on this earth, causing way more trouble than anyone really has the right to live through.

From the start of his career in the mid-’50s, it was hard to put Cash into any narrow creative box. He first presented himself as a gospel singer, a move shot down by label owners. Most of his success came on the country charts, even though nothing else coming out of Nashville sounded, or looked like, him (he earned the nickname the ‘Man in Black’ because he didn’t match the white bedazzled look of his peers.)

To further complicate things, his spirit and rhythms often belonged more to rock ‘n’ roll, and lyrically his songs fell more into traditional folk music. For someone with a lesser personality, that could result in a creative muddle, but his strength of spirit shone through, making him a beloved, multi-genre and cross-generational icon.

Of course, everyone knows he had trouble with booze, pills, the law, and generally anyone telling him he couldn’t do something. We all remember the iconic picture of him flipping off some poor sap in the recording studio, right? But did you know he once (allegedly) started a forest fire?

None of that stopped him from growing in stature in the eyes of his peers and music lovers everywhere. Even the natural creative ups and downs, dalliances with trends and so on that doomed many of his peers were unable to tarnish Cash’s reputation. Even in the image-obsessed ’80s, he managed to successfully hold his ground by teaming up with old running buddies like Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings.

Early in the ’90s, Cash enjoyed an amazing critical revival with the help of Rick Rubin, who produced a series of records that removed much of the modern calcium excess that had obscured the primal appeal of the Man in Black’s mid-career records. If they got a bit too much praise than maybe they really deserved on their own merit, well, call it a lifetime achievement award or a victory lap for a true individual who always did things his way. Hell, they even made a pretty good movie about him.
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Re: John Cash

Postby Rocky » Mon Feb 28, 2011 9:23 pm

[b]Sounds great, very good report, all except the movie. It was pure crap (this even comes from Cash drummer W.S. Holland) and the people who really knew Cash's life story. The movie was 90% fiction. There's at least 80 mistakes in it that I can find, and likely many more. It's the worst bio picture ever filmed.
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Re: John Cash

Postby bailbath » Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:21 pm

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.c ... 1I730D.DTL

In February 2010, just a month before his death, photographer Jim Marshall prepared some notes on his relationship with Johnny Cash for his final book, "Pocket Cash." Here is an exclusive excerpt:

I first met Johnny Cash when he was hanging out with Bob Dylan at some Greenwich Village nightclub in 1962. We just hit it off. I photographed him at the Newport Folk Festivals. When I came back out to San Francisco in '64, we stayed in touch.

When Columbia Records agreed to do the Folsom Prison shows - producer Bob Johnston talked them into doing it - John called them to have me shoot the concerts. There was one other photographer there; I don't know if he even got inside. I had unlimited access at Folsom; I could go anywhere I wanted. Pop music writer Bob Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times was there - one of his first assignments for the paper. He's in some of the photos. The album, "At Folsom Prison," was recorded on a four-track. John brought his whole show - the Statler Brothers, Mother Maybelle Carter and Carl Perkins, with the Tennessee Three.

Cash stepped down off the bus just as the steel doors to the prison clanged shut and said, "There's a feeling of permanence to that sound." He went into Greystone Chapel and meditated, prayed there for a little bit. It was small, held maybe forty, fifty people. He was going to record a song called "Greystone Chapel" written by one of the inmates, Glen Sherley. He cared about the prisoners a lot. He cared about the conditions and tried to help improve them. Johnny was never in prison. He got busted once for being drunk, peeing on the sidewalk, something like that - big deal - but never for a serious crime. The myth of Johnny is not the man.

Later, they asked me to go to San Quentin. They used somebody else's shot for the album cover, more stylized. The shots on the back are mine. San Quentin is where I got the finger at the sound check. That is probably the most ripped-off photograph in the history of the world. There was a TV crew behind me and John was on the side of the stage. I said, "John, let's do a shot for the warden." He flipped out the bird. Three frames, a 21-millimeter lens. I don't know if the film crew caught it. Elton John bought all three frames.

Billy Roberts, who wrote "Hey Joe," and I had written a song called "Hang Out with Me." It was a folk song. I wanted John and June to cut it. They invited us down for Thanksgiving, along with Tom Jans, who wrote "Lovin' Arms." Johnny cut that for Tommy. They cut "Hang Out With Me" like a ballad. I was too intimidated by Cash to say "Hey, do it like 'Jackson.' " What can you say to Cash?

I went down to photograph the first episode of the ABC-TV series, "The Johnny Cash Show," at Ryman Auditorium, home of Nashville's Grand Ole Opry. It was a very big deal - Dylan's first public appearance since his motorcycle crash.

At the rehearsal, one of Dylan's men came up to me and said "Bobby doesn't want any pictures taken." I said, "Bobby knows me well enough that he could come up and ask me personally." "That's not the way he does things," the guy said. Just at that moment, June Carter comes by. Our voices were getting a little hot. June said, in a very sweet voice, "Jim, what's the matter?" "We don't want any photos taken," Dylan's guy said. "Well, son," June said, "Who are you?" "I'm with Bob Dylan," he said. "Jim is with me," she said. "This is my TV show. Jim is my photographer and he can do whatever he wants." Who's going to say anything to June Carter? Dylan didn't say s-. I shot the two of them from about ten feet away.

Over the years, I've done record covers with John, magazine spreads. I can't remember which ones. We're talking about thirty years of photographs. I did Waylon Jennings at the house with him. A couple of Johnny's kids came by. Shot them. Shot his mom and dad with him at the house. Felt very comfortable. John trusted me.

Funny story - about five years ago I got a call from Steve Bing to shoot Jerry Lee Lewis in Nashville. Over the years our paths never crossed and yet Jerry had photographs of mine - Kristofferson, Cash, Waylon, Carl Perkins - in his house. Jerry said, "Jim, I've got to ask you a serious question. What took you so damn long to get around to me?"

Johnny had an edge. When John walked in a room, you knew he was there. There was a hint of danger, but I don't think he was a violent man. You just knew he was there. He had a presence that very few artists have. I think it shows in the photographs.

He didn't suffer fools gladly. He kept a close bunch of friends that were very tight to him. The people who loved him, loved him fiercely, and vice versa. His wife, June Carter, was his lifeline. I remember when they got back together, about a year before the Folsom concerts. He stopped doing drugs. June kept him off the drugs and saved his life. I think the day she died, he died. {sbox}

E-mail Aidin Vaziri at at avaziri@sfchronicle.com.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.c ... z1H95v9MEX
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Re: John Cash

Postby Tumppi » Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:26 pm

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Re: Johnny Cash

Postby paperboy » Mon Aug 08, 2011 3:04 pm

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Last edited by paperboy on Sat Aug 27, 2011 4:46 am, edited 3 times in total.
TV producent John de Mol: “Ik zie het meer als een algemene tendens in dit land, dat wie boven het maaiveld probeert uit te steken altijd op weerstand stuit. Hou het maar bij het oude, doe maar gewoon en doe eigenlijk liever vooral niks. “
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Re: John Cash

Postby Rocky » Tue Aug 09, 2011 12:58 pm

Marshall Grant, 83, died of blood clot at Cash Festival in Jonesboro, Arkansas, August 7th. He was original bass player and road manager to Cash from 1955-1980 in the Tennessee Two. He wrote the book: JOHNNY CASH: I WAS THERE WHEN IT HAPPENED.
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Re: Johnny Cash

Postby yorkshire88 » Fri Jan 20, 2012 7:25 pm

For those of you with Sky TV, look out for "The Gospel Music of Johnny Cash" on Sky Arts 1 (ch244 in SD or ch243 in HD) Saturday night at 6pm (21st Jan 2012), "...featuring rare footage and performances."
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Re: John Cash

Postby FernandoOscarGil » Mon Sep 02, 2013 6:59 pm

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On September 12, it will be 10 years since the death of Johnny Cash.- (26.2.1932 - 12.9.2003)
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Re: John Cash

Postby PeterC » Mon Sep 02, 2013 7:14 pm

Why on earth would you want to commemorate such a sad event? Far better to remember artist's birthdays.

I remember Linda Gail complaining to me one time that Graceland / Memphis always "celebrates" Elvis' death rather than his birth, though I'm sure that's at least partly for commercial reasons (mid August is a far better time for tourists than early January!).
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Re: John Cash

Postby bailbath » Mon Sep 02, 2013 7:33 pm

Thinking about someone who has died always arrives around the anniversary of their death. You can be positive in remembering that person. I think that is normal.
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Re: John Cash

Postby FernandoOscarGil » Thu Sep 12, 2013 12:22 am

TEN YEARS WITHOUT CASH

September 12 2003 - September 12 2013.

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http://youtu.be/goHgAhQ5jTg

This is my special page tribute to Johnny Cash

http://johnnycashforever.es.tl/

In the options on the left, you can enter to every label in which Johnny Cash was recorded, and can check, one by one, the reviews of each album that he released.

Johnny Cash, for ever!

Fernando Gil.-
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Re: John Cash

Postby FernandoOscarGil » Thu Sep 12, 2013 10:28 am

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The Master of Life has been good to me

He has given me strength to face past illnesses, and victory in the face of defeat. It has given me life and joy where other saw oblivion. He has given me a new purpose to live for, new services to render and old wounds to heal. The Life and Love continue, let the music sounds.

Johnny Cash
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Johnny Cash Museum To Host Robert Hilburn Book Lecture

Postby FernandoOscarGil » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:47 pm

Johnny Cash Museum To Host Robert Hilburn Book Lecture
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The Johnny Cash Museum has already earned the title of one of the hottest new attractions in the city, with its recent topping of Forbes Magazine’s list of “Top 5 Must-See” destinations in Nashville, and now the museum is unveiling a brand new event space. Renowned journalist Robert Hilburnwill christen the new space on Nov. 1 with a symposium on the life of the Man In Black, hosted by museum founder Bill Miller.

Hilburn’s new book on Cash’s life, Johnny Cash: The Life will be released by Little, Brown and Company on Oct. 29, and will cover the legend’s artistic career and turbulent personal life. Before launching into projects such as his latest book, Hilburn was the music critic for the L.A. Times from 1970-2005, and was the only music writer allowed into Folsom Prison to witness Cash’s legendary performance at the penitentiary.

“Of the many great rock pioneers in the 1950s,” Hilburn says, “Cash was the only one who approached his music as more than hits for the jukebox. He wanted his music to inspire and uplift people. In that goal, he was the crucial link between Woody Guthrie’s music of social idealism and commentary in the 1930s and 1940s and Bob Dylan’s music of revolution in the 1960s and beyond.”

Doors for the Q&A will open at 6 p.m., and admission is free.
For Lorie Hollabaugh .-
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THE JOHNNY CASH MUSEUM - NEW WEBSITE

Postby FernandoOscarGil » Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:21 am

THE JOHNNY CASH MUSEUM - NEW WEBSITE

http://www.johnnycashmuseum.com/

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